Jump to content
Community Updates:

The other things we do.


MM1986

194 views

 Share

Next to fighting fires, I loved (and still do) cutting up vehicles.
And in my 15 years of service, I've dissasembled pretty much a whole junkyard, of course with help of my brothers and sisters.
I've cut into anything from a beat up lunchbox to a Ferrari, even a city bus and all European brands of truck.
Seen all sorts of outcomes for the pinned in persons, from nothing more then a scratch to unrecognisable mangled bodies, even a 140+ car pileup, but enough about that, after the last entry, I'm not really up to bring up bad memories just yet, so more on that in a later entry.

So here is a story about a MVA that stayed with me over the years that had a good outcome.

We go back to summer 2008.
We just completed our daily check on Engine 4530 and were headed for the living quarters for some coffee and a lecture about something boring, can't remember what is was.
But before the lady from HR could even start her lecture, we were toned out for a accident with a pin in.
We responded in 4530 and followed by 4570 our heavy rescue truck.
And sure enough at the location, which is a major crossing where cyclists merge into traffic to go to one of the many schools in the city, the police was busy to create a safe work space for us, but it was no accident as we assumed and dispatch radioed through.
There was a single black SUV on the cycling lane, parked in a rather strange angle and 2 legs sticking out from under it, recognisable was the green color the local ambulance service gear.

We disembarked and were greeted by the driver of the ambulance that arrived a few minutes before us.
There was a six year old girl under the car, she was stable, but her legs were stuck between the chassis of the car and the frame of her bicycle, and as expected, in sheer panic.
I was assigned to go under the car and help the paramedic to see what was to be the safest way to free the girl while the rest of my crew were stabilising the vehicle.

The paramedic could calm the girl a little when I stuffed myself next to them, and I just started making small talk while I used the torch/flashlight to look at the girls legs and hips to see how she was pinned.
Because the frame of the bike and the exaust of the SUV were the reason she was stuck we opted for an airbag lift as the old rescue didn't have a crane, as the current one delivered in 2009 does.

So we were prepairing, I scooted back under the car to explain to the girl and the paramedic what wer were gonna do.
When I finished explaining I heard the clicks of a pair of high heel shoes, and saw a pair of feet walking towards the boots of our lieutenant and battalion chief.
Then a bored but shrieking voice was heard "Are you gonna be busy with my car much longer? I have a meeting to go to, and I'm already late"
Our lieutenant, a guy I've rarely seen speechless, was indeed speechless, but our battalion chief was not, I can still hear him telling that aweful woman "Miss, there is a 6 year old girl under there, we are working, so if you will excuse us, we are trying to save a life" then he apparently gestured the police to come and take her away, which was not to her liking, as she started yellling and shrieking, calling us all sorts of names that I'm not going to repeat here.
So the officers put her in cuffs and brought her to the police van nearby.
Later it turned out tha lady had traces of alcohol and drugs in her bloodwork, a suspended licence and she drove at least 45 mph in a 10 zone over a bridge where only city busses and cyclists were allowed.

But.... back to the accident, with the car lifted a few inches, we could free the girl, and get her to the waiting ambulance, where her worried to death parents were waiting.
Turned out she had some cuts, a badly bruised hip and a sprained wrist, but was otherwise healthy.
Later that week we recieved a big thank you cake and a drawing from the girl and her parents thanking us for the work we did, still gives me a happy feeling.

That lovely lady that drove the SUV later was sentenced by a judge to 300 hours of community service, 5 year driving suspention on top of the 18 month suspention she already had, her car was impounded and she had to pay all medical expenses and a €5000 compensation.

Next time, more stories by me, I hope you enjoyed this one.
 

Edited by MM1986

  • Like 5
 Share

10 Comments


Recommended Comments

Another cool story! One question, you said “The paramedic could calm the girl a little when I stuffed myself next to them, and I just started making small talk while I used the torch to look at the girls legs and hips to see how she was pinned.” Do you mean a flashlight? (I understand they call them torches in some places)

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Very neat story! Starting to really enjo9y these blog entries! Just wondering, many fire departments across North America have started responding to medical emergencies and they often make up more then half the calls they roll too (annually). Did you department have you responding to medical calls? Looking forward to reading the next story!

Link to comment
1 hour ago, Joshua B said:

Another cool story! One question, you said “The paramedic could calm the girl a little when I stuffed myself next to them, and I just started making small talk while I used the torch to look at the girls legs and hips to see how she was pinned.” Do you mean a flashlight? (I understand they call them torches in some places)

Yeah I think he meant flashlight. I used to call them torches for a while too 😅

Link to comment
1 hour ago, Joshua B said:

Another cool story! One question, you said “The paramedic could calm the girl a little when I stuffed myself next to them, and I just started making small talk while I used the torch to look at the girls legs and hips to see how she was pinned.” Do you mean a flashlight? (I understand they call them torches in some places)

 

7 minutes ago, Rescue 423 said:

Yeah I think he meant flashlight. I used to call them torches for a while too 😅


Indeed, its a UK thing, been on a few training courses in the UK, and they call them torches. 😄
 

  • Like 2
Link to comment

I enjoyed this story, great ending! I found it interesting that your heavy rescues have cranes on them...that is something that is very rare here in the states. Usually if a crane is needed, a local heavy rescue company is called to the scene because they have better training in that field.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
13 hours ago, Josh said:

I enjoyed this story, great ending! I found it interesting that your heavy rescues have cranes on them...that is something that is very rare here in the states. Usually if a crane is needed, a local heavy rescue company is called to the scene because they have better training in that field.

Thanks for the compliment. 

Cranes on our heavy rescues were usually reserved for the larger city departments as they have had a bigger budget, but when our fire departments merged from local to county level, and all budgets were combined, we got the financial capability to purchase some much needed upgrades to the fleet.
Our old Iveco heavy rescue (3rd pic) was bought back in 1989 when its sole duty was responding to MVA's, through the years it got many more tasks like animal rescue, HAZMAT, more types of entrapments, MCI etc.
Also our response area's grew as several volunteer crews nearby lost their heavy rescue capability with the standardisation of the equipment carried on the Engines.
So when replacing the Iveco, we had apretty clear picture of what we needed the truck to do. 
But when we approached the truck builders like Ziegler, Touw and Rosenbauer, they came with a pricetag that was pretty steep because of the crane, straining our budget and would have looked something like the 4th pic.
So we had to find another solution, then we figured out that we could tag along on a national grant for new Volvo 6x6 hooklift trucks, we ordered one, with some modifications, different lightbar, airhorn siren, heavier crane and a winch on the nose of the rig.
We put the largest rescue container on it that the rig could carry and we had a pretty unique concept, and a crane to lift up to 16 thousand lbs.
But we have an agreement with local towing and construction companies that if needed they can send a larger crane if the object weighs more then 16 thousand lbs.

145293.jpg

brandweer-4570.jpg

4570 Stromenweg_1.JPG

data.1120xC1280x853.33333333333+0+-0.1120x747.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
11 hours ago, MM1986 said:

Thanks for the compliment. 

Cranes on our heavy rescues were usually reserved for the larger city departments as they have had a bigger budget, but when our fire departments merged from local to county level, and all budgets were combined, we got the financial capability to purchase some much needed upgrades to the fleet.
Our old Iveco heavy rescue (3rd pic) was bought back in 1989 when its sole duty was responding to MVA's, through the years it got many more tasks like animal rescue, HAZMAT, more types of entrapments, MCI etc.
Also our response area's grew as several volunteer crews nearby lost their heavy rescue capability with the standardisation of the equipment carried on the Engines.
So when replacing the Iveco, we had apretty clear picture of what we needed the truck to do. 
But when we approached the truck builders like Ziegler, Touw and Rosenbauer, they came with a pricetag that was pretty steep because of the crane, straining our budget and would have looked something like the 4th pic.
So we had to find another solution, then we figured out that we could tag along on a national grant for new Volvo 6x6 hooklift trucks, we ordered one, with some modifications, different lightbar, airhorn siren, heavier crane and a winch on the nose of the rig.
We put the largest rescue container on it that the rig could carry and we had a pretty unique concept, and a crane to lift up to 16 thousand lbs.
But we have an agreement with local towing and construction companies that if needed they can send a larger crane if the object weighs more then 16 thousand lbs.

145293.jpg

brandweer-4570.jpg

4570 Stromenweg_1.JPG

data.1120xC1280x853.33333333333+0+-0.1120x747.jpg

Those are some neat rigs! Would I be correct in assuming that the first and second pictures are the current one you guys run? Very cool truck... may try my hand at a Lego version someday.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
11 hours ago, MM1986 said:

Thanks for the compliment. 

Cranes on our heavy rescues were usually reserved for the larger city departments as they have had a bigger budget, but when our fire departments merged from local to county level, and all budgets were combined, we got the financial capability to purchase some much needed upgrades to the fleet.
Our old Iveco heavy rescue (3rd pic) was bought back in 1989 when its sole duty was responding to MVA's, through the years it got many more tasks like animal rescue, HAZMAT, more types of entrapments, MCI etc.
Also our response area's grew as several volunteer crews nearby lost their heavy rescue capability with the standardisation of the equipment carried on the Engines.
So when replacing the Iveco, we had apretty clear picture of what we needed the truck to do. 
But when we approached the truck builders like Ziegler, Touw and Rosenbauer, they came with a pricetag that was pretty steep because of the crane, straining our budget and would have looked something like the 4th pic.
So we had to find another solution, then we figured out that we could tag along on a national grant for new Volvo 6x6 hooklift trucks, we ordered one, with some modifications, different lightbar, airhorn siren, heavier crane and a winch on the nose of the rig.
We put the largest rescue container on it that the rig could carry and we had a pretty unique concept, and a crane to lift up to 16 thousand lbs.
But we have an agreement with local towing and construction companies that if needed they can send a larger crane if the object weighs more then 16 thousand lbs.

145293.jpg

brandweer-4570.jpg

4570 Stromenweg_1.JPG

data.1120xC1280x853.33333333333+0+-0.1120x747.jpg

That last one looks good though

Link to comment
On 6/11/2021 at 12:38 AM, Josh said:

Those are some neat rigs! Would I be correct in assuming that the first and second pictures are the current one you guys run? Very cool truck... may try my hand at a Lego version someday.

You're right. 😉

  • Like 1
Link to comment
On 6/11/2021 at 12:39 AM, Rescue 423 said:

That last one looks good though

Thats the current line of Dutch spec heavy rescues. 🙂

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

The Water Cooler

The Water Cooler

    You don't have permission to chat.
    ×
    ×
    • Create New...

    Important Information

    Terms of Use | Guidelines | Privacy Policy
    We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.